Skip to content

Join the Wikiprogress Online Consultation on Youth Well-being

11 April 2015
by Justin Dupre-Harbord

BLI InitiativeThe Wikiprogress Online Consultation on Youth Well-being is open now and running until the 8th May.

How should we measure and define “youth well-being”?

What works for improving young people’s well-being?

How can we improve the process for effective youth policy?

For the next month, we want to gather ideas from as wide a group of people as possible about how to improve the way that governments and other social actors can improve well-being outcomes for young people.

The findings of the consultation will be presented at the OECD Forum in Paris in June, and a report will be handed out and made available to policy makers, foundations, civil society organisations and others in the Wikiprogress network.

We have started the consultation with some broad questions, but want the debate to evolve as more people contribute and add their own questions and ideas. So sign up now and join the debate!

Useful links

For more information contact us via:

 

One Response leave one →
  1. April 13, 2015

    I run a small international college and have students arrive from many countries. Most are from the Middle East and North and Central Africa. It’s not surprising then, that some of the biggest issues they bring are: Lack of security at home, poorly run institutions and services, riddled with corruption at all levels.
    Many despair of things changing, which is understandable given the present political situations in the whole area. Refreshingly though, a fair number say that once they have achieved their education goals, they intend to return and make change. This is just one perspective, I know, but it shows that change can be made through education. This should be nurtured by their experience here as well. However, the actions and rhetoric of our present government and politicians in general, are hardly likely to provide that support.

Leave a Reply

Note: You can use basic XHTML in your comments. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS